1. Verse of the day.

    Verse of the day.

  2. nbacooldudes:

Jason Terry and Chris Wilcox — Boston Celtics

    nbacooldudes:

    Jason Terry and Chris Wilcox  Boston Celtics

    Reblogged from: nbacooldudes
  3. punkmonsieur:

Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

    punkmonsieur:

    Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

    Reblogged from: iwishtocontinue
  4. punkmonsieur:

Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

    punkmonsieur:

    Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

    Reblogged from: iwishtocontinue
  5. michaelbastian:

Michael Bastian S/S 2015
Look 27

    michaelbastian:

    Michael Bastian S/S 2015

    Look 27

    Reblogged from: iwishtocontinue
  6. Reblogged from: hommism
  7. Reblogged from: hommism
  8. Reblogged from: hommism
  9. Reblogged from: hommism
  10. Reblogged from: hommism
  11. Reblogged from: hommism
  12. dynamicafrica:

Every African must show his pass before being allowed to go about his business. Sometimes check broadens into search of a man’s person and belongings.
South Africa.
Ph: Ernest Cole.
1960s.
Black people were by law supposed to carry a pass book that severely limited their movements by forcing them to have one on their person when entering ‘white only’ areas.
This served as a way for the Apartheid government to ensure their segregationist policies were being adhered to by requiring black people to carry these passes at all times when outside of areas designated for black people. Each pass book also specified when, where and for how long the individual would be permitted to stay within these ‘white only’ areas. Often times, employers were responsible for providing these details. 
Pass laws were formally introduced as early as 1797 when, in an attempt to exclude all ‘Natvies’ (black people) from the Cape Colony, Irish-born British statesman and governor of the Cape Colony George Macartney introduced them to South Africa which was then a British territory.
The most notable resistance effort against Pass Laws was in 1960 with the peaceful demonstrations held in the township of Sharpeville on March 21st that year. Thousands of black people held demonstrations in Sharpeville, marching to the police station where Apartheid police forces opened fire on the crowd killing 69 people in what is now known as the Sharpeville Massacre. Anti-apartheid leader and founder of the Pan-Africanist Congress Robert Sobukwe was arrested on that day for leading the protest.
Pass laws would not be repealed in South Africa until 1986.

    dynamicafrica:

    Every African must show his pass before being allowed to go about his business. Sometimes check broadens into search of a man’s person and belongings.

    South Africa.

    Ph: Ernest Cole.

    1960s.

    Black people were by law supposed to carry a pass book that severely limited their movements by forcing them to have one on their person when entering ‘white only’ areas.

    This served as a way for the Apartheid government to ensure their segregationist policies were being adhered to by requiring black people to carry these passes at all times when outside of areas designated for black people. Each pass book also specified when, where and for how long the individual would be permitted to stay within these ‘white only’ areas. Often times, employers were responsible for providing these details. 

    Pass laws were formally introduced as early as 1797 when, in an attempt to exclude all ‘Natvies’ (black people) from the Cape Colony, Irish-born British statesman and governor of the Cape Colony George Macartney introduced them to South Africa which was then a British territory.

    The most notable resistance effort against Pass Laws was in 1960 with the peaceful demonstrations held in the township of Sharpeville on March 21st that year. Thousands of black people held demonstrations in Sharpeville, marching to the police station where Apartheid police forces opened fire on the crowd killing 69 people in what is now known as the Sharpeville Massacre. Anti-apartheid leader and founder of the Pan-Africanist Congress Robert Sobukwe was arrested on that day for leading the protest.

    Pass laws would not be repealed in South Africa until 1986.

    Reblogged from: dynamicafrica
  13. dynamicafrica:

"African chiefs sentenced to death by the Germans for their role in the Maji Maji rebellion"
The Maji Maji Rebellion, lasting from 1905 to 1907, was an organized uprising initiated by several groups of African communities in the colonized territory of German East Africa against German colonial rule and German policy that forced them to grow cotton for export, profiting the German colonists.
German colonial efforts in east Africa were initiated by the German Colonization Society (yes, they actually had an organization dedicated to colonialist missions) led by an extremely violent and racist man named Karl Peters. In the book “The Origins of Totalitarianism”, it is said that, "[The] African colonial possessions became the most fertile soil for the flowering of what was later to become the Nazi elite". Testimony to the extremely violent nature of German colonialism in parts of Africa.
Peters, who believed Germans to be a superior race and a believer of Social Darwinism, used ideologies relating to völkisch to fuel his ruthless ambitions in German East Africa which included him murdering large segments of local populations who opposed German occupation. This led to him being labelled “Mkono wa Damu,” meaning “Man with Blood on His Hands”, by the local Tanganyika population, where he was governor.
The series of events that led to the Maji Maji uprising stemmed from a system where the Germans began levying head taxes and charging each village with a quota of cotton production through the use of slave labor.
Following a drought in 1905 that threatened the region and the quota imposed against various villages set by the Germans, several communities banded together under the command of a medium named Kinjikitile Ngwale to oppose and resist German colonial policies. Ngwale claimed to be possessed by a snake spirit called Hongo and had communicated with the deity Bokera (no substantial information found on Bokera). Through this encouner, Ngwale had put together a concoction - the maji - consisting of castor oil and millet seed, that was said to be able to turn German bullets into water.
Armed with this liquid and their traditional war tools, the united local communities, empowered by Ngwale, went about destroying German-run cotton plants. These communities included various ethnic groups such as the Ngoni, Matumbi, and Ngindo people.
Unfortunately, due to the lack of artillery and firepower in the form of machine guns and canons, the Maji Maji rebels were terribly defeated. Furthermore, German reinforcements were sent from Germany to assist the colonists in their attacks on the anti-colonial fighters.
The German governor of East Africa at the time, Gustav Adolf von Götzen, used famine as a weapon of war, destroying entire villages, burning crops and killing livestock. One of the leaders of the German troops, Captain Wangenheim, wrote to von Götzen saying, “Only hunger and want can bring about a final submission. Military actions alone will remain more or less a drop in the ocean.”
It is estimated that at least 10, 000 casualties and losses were suffered by the Maji Maji rebels, and 15 Europeans and almost 400 Askari’s (local guards employed by the Germans) were the estimated casualties on the colonist’s side.

    dynamicafrica:

    "African chiefs sentenced to death by the Germans for their role in the Maji Maji rebellion"

    The Maji Maji Rebellion, lasting from 1905 to 1907, was an organized uprising initiated by several groups of African communities in the colonized territory of German East Africa against German colonial rule and German policy that forced them to grow cotton for export, profiting the German colonists.

    German colonial efforts in east Africa were initiated by the German Colonization Society (yes, they actually had an organization dedicated to colonialist missions) led by an extremely violent and racist man named Karl Peters. In the book “The Origins of Totalitarianism”, it is said that, "[The] African colonial possessions became the most fertile soil for the flowering of what was later to become the Nazi elite". Testimony to the extremely violent nature of German colonialism in parts of Africa.

    Peters, who believed Germans to be a superior race and a believer of Social Darwinism, used ideologies relating to völkisch to fuel his ruthless ambitions in German East Africa which included him murdering large segments of local populations who opposed German occupation. This led to him being labelled “Mkono wa Damu,” meaning “Man with Blood on His Hands”, by the local Tanganyika population, where he was governor.

    The series of events that led to the Maji Maji uprising stemmed from a system where the Germans began levying head taxes and charging each village with a quota of cotton production through the use of slave labor.

    Following a drought in 1905 that threatened the region and the quota imposed against various villages set by the Germans, several communities banded together under the command of a medium named Kinjikitile Ngwale to oppose and resist German colonial policies. Ngwale claimed to be possessed by a snake spirit called Hongo and had communicated with the deity Bokera (no substantial information found on Bokera). Through this encouner, Ngwale had put together a concoction - the maji - consisting of castor oil and millet seed, that was said to be able to turn German bullets into water.

    Armed with this liquid and their traditional war tools, the united local communities, empowered by Ngwale, went about destroying German-run cotton plants. These communities included various ethnic groups such as the Ngoni, Matumbi, and Ngindo people.

    Unfortunately, due to the lack of artillery and firepower in the form of machine guns and canons, the Maji Maji rebels were terribly defeated. Furthermore, German reinforcements were sent from Germany to assist the colonists in their attacks on the anti-colonial fighters.

    The German governor of East Africa at the time, Gustav Adolf von Götzen, used famine as a weapon of war, destroying entire villages, burning crops and killing livestock. One of the leaders of the German troops, Captain Wangenheim, wrote to von Götzen saying, “Only hunger and want can bring about a final submission. Military actions alone will remain more or less a drop in the ocean.”

    It is estimated that at least 10, 000 casualties and losses were suffered by the Maji Maji rebels, and 15 Europeans and almost 400 Askari’s (local guards employed by the Germans) were the estimated casualties on the colonist’s side.

    Reblogged from: dynamicafrica
  14. unclefather:

    gf: Come over

    me: i can’t i’m skiing

    gf: I have dog treats

    me: image

    Reblogged from: ruinedchildhood
  15. blackcontemporaryart:

Yinka Shonibare, MBEHow To Blow Up Two Heads At Once (Gentlemen) – image Axel Schneider © MMK Frankfurt

    blackcontemporaryart:

    Yinka Shonibare, MBE
    How To Blow Up Two Heads At Once (Gentlemen) – image Axel Schneider © MMK Frankfurt

    Reblogged from: blackcontemporaryart
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